A couple of

0
0

A couple of years ago, I finally got around to visiting an NHS dentist, after not going regularly for several years.

I’d had extensive crown work some 20 years previously on the NHS back in the early 90’s. (My dentist was at pains to point out that I’d had over £60,000 worth of work done at then current private prices, just to make me feel ‘small’ about it…)

Over the years, most of the crowns had one by one come away or broken off at the gumline due to decay as my gums gradually receded. (I’m now in my mid-50s.) Having become very self-conscious about opening my mouth at all, I decided to bite thew bullet, and get them seen to.

I had several badly decayed lower molars removed initially, then got made redundant. This meant finances were at a premium suddenly, and further treatment had to be put on the back burner.

Lat year, I managed to scrape together enough money to go and see about having the remaining decayed teeth extracted, and dentures fitted. To my horror, the Polish lady dentist didn’t extract the remainder of my teeth, but instead ground them back to the gum-line AND THEN FITTED THE NEW DENTURES OVER THE TOP OF THEM!

I’m no’expert’, but surely this is malpractice? These ‘stumps’ will continue to rot away, and then I can see endless problems arising.

What are your views on this…..and do I have a legal case here?

Marked as spam
Asked on 25/03/2018 12:00 am
10 views
0
Private answer

The creation of an ‘overdenture’ is a common procedure. You did not mention if the retained roots had been root treated (sealed). The roots will provide support for your new denture ,giving you time to get used to wearing them. The roots can be removed as and when they cause trouble (additional professional fees will usually apply). They may also be used to create attachments to help retain the denture.
You should take care to moderate sugar in your diet and ensure that you keep the exposed root surfaces meticulously clean to try to avoid tooth decay.
I note that my colleague Dr Mandon-Gassman has provided a similar answer to your question

Marked as spam
Posted by Dental Professional (Questions: 0, Answers: 1474)
Answered on 03/04/2018 12:00 am
0
Private answer

Hi Mike

Yes there is a risk of the roots ‘rotting’ under the dentures if you eat and drink sugary foods between meals and them getting gum infections if they are not kept perfectly clean with precise brushing

BUT...

this very rarely happens and by maintaining the roots you prevent bone loss which affects the fit of the dentures leading to additional expense as the dentures need to be relined or replaced as each root is removed with additional cost for each extraction

After tooth loss it takes 3-6 months for the bone to stabilise which can lead to ongoing difficulties with comfort in eating

Bearing this in mind I regularly do what your dentist has done and only extract the roots if I have to

If and when finances allow it maybe possible to use the retained roots for precision attachments to secure future dentures as an alternative to Implants with which you may be more familiar

Marked as spam
Posted by Dental Professional (Questions: 0, Answers: 1474)
Answered on 28/03/2018 12:00 am