I had part

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I had part of one of my back tooth come away, went to the dentist who fixed this, but it put pressure on my front teeth, so I went back and he relieved the pressure. He said that because the back filling was around the outside of the tooth as well, it had taken up more space, so he filed in between a couple of other teeth. The pressure went away but then I noticed that my top front teeth has started to move slightly, by this I mean that they sort of clicked together while eating and stuff. I went back, he had a look and said it was not a problem, he filed the back tooth down some more to get more of a gap back and said that the other teeth were moving slightly, annoying as it was, it was ok because they would just right themselves, I had to give it time. It was because of the bunching from the back tooth being a bit larger and my bite had changed causing this problem. I wanted to know how long this could take because some days they don’t move at all and others they click together a little. My dentist had a look and said that the teeth have moved slightly but once they are comfortable in their new place they will settle down and not move. He also said that to me it feels like they are moving miles, but in fact it is probably only less than a hair. He pushed on the teeth to see if they had become loose but said they had not and this was normal for them to move slightly while getting used to a new bite. I am sorry if I sound a little confused, I was just wondering how long it would take to stop moving, cos as I said some days they don’t move at all and others they do.

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Asked on 17/09/2008 12:00 am
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All teeth are attached to the jaw bone via a fibrous tissue 'ligament' which allows slight movement and contains nerve endings that tell the brain how much pressure is b'ing applied to the tooth. Very few of us have teeth that meet 100% in harmony with the way that the jaw functions and an increased awareness of this can lead to the symptoms that you describe. This is like walking with a stone in your shoe for so long that you have subconsciously modified the way you walk to compensate and no longer notice the stone but do notice the blister on the other foot from your poor gait or knee joint clicking. In my experience if your bite does not feel correct then it will need adjusting in some way. For minor discrepancies this might be by the trial and error technique that your dentist is providing but if the original broken tooth was the 'stone in the shoe' then it might have changed the way you bite in such a way that it has made you acutely aware of the natural disharmony between your jaw function and your bite. If this is the case then it might take a thorough investigation of your jaw function and equilibration (adjustment of the shape) of your teeth to create ideal function but this is a long road to start on if a simple adjustment to the new filling will suffice

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Posted by Dental Professional (Questions: 0, Answers: 1475)
Answered on 17/09/2008 12:00 am