I have composite

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I have composite fillings but they are discolouring. Should this happen and can I have fillings that won’t discolour?

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Asked on 13/12/2005 12:00 am
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This can happen more easily when composites are not finished properly.  Once they are discoloured, there is no alternative but to live with them or have them replaced, depending upon the advice of your dentist.  Older composites tended to do this more than the more modern ones.  The dentist will need to polish really well to help stop it discolouring over time.  Due to the contours and accessibility in the oral environment, it is not always as easy as it seems. 


You could also use porcelain that is chemically bonded to the underlying dentine and enamel.  This is a very time-consuming, highly skilled process, which does deliver very good results.  The skill is quite often down to cementation and finishing in the mouth.  If this technique is used and done well, it will provide the best stable result with the best aesthetics possible on vital teeth in the profession and should last a very long time.  The costs are obviously more but boy does it look good! 


When porcelain is used as a material, it should be noted that it is harder than the natural dentition.  Depending upon balanced occlusal health, it can eventually put excessive force on the restoration.  It may break the restoration, the tooth itself or the opposing teeth.  The more tooth-friendly restoration would be made from composite in a dental laboratory where artistic skill can interpret the natural dentition and the composite is polished extremely well.  The result is very stable, long-term and slightly flexible.  (This is new technology).  Ten year case studies show good colour stability.    

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Posted by Dental Professional (Questions: 0, Answers: 1475)
Answered on 10/05/2006 12:00 am
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Private answer

This can happen more easily when composites are not finished properly.  Once they are discoloured, there is no alternative but to live with them or have them replaced, depending upon the advice of your dentist.  Older composites tended to do this more than the more modern ones.  The dentist will need to polish really well to help stop it discolouring over time.  Due to the contours and accessibility in the oral environment, it is not always as easy as it seems. 


You could also use porcelain that is chemically bonded to the underlying dentine and enamel.  This is a very time-consuming, highly skilled process, which does deliver very good results.  The skill is quite often down to cementation and finishing in the mouth.  If this technique is used and done well, it will provide the best stable result with the best aesthetics possible on vital teeth in the profession and should last a very long time.  The costs are obviously more but boy does it look good! 


When porcelain is used as a material, it should be noted that it is harder than the natural dentition.  Depending upon balanced occlusal health, it can eventually put excessive force on the restoration.  It may break the restoration, the tooth itself or the opposing teeth.  The more tooth-friendly restoration would be made from composite in a dental laboratory where artistic skill can interpret the natural dentition and the composite is polished extremely well.  The result is very stable, long-term and slightly flexible.  (This is new technology).  Ten year case studies show good colour stability.    

Marked as spam
Posted by Dental Professional (Questions: 0, Answers: 1475)
Answered on 13/12/2005 12:00 am