My dentist has

0
0

My dentist has identified 2 teeth that I have brushed so hard, the enamel is completely worn off at the top, and the dentine is exposed. She suggests composite bonding in order to avert impending disaster. Are there other options? How safe is this option, and how long-term is it?


               here is some feedback from this patient


‘thank you so much for providing an important service to us all


Roni’

Marked as spam
Asked on 13/10/2007 12:00 am
3 views
0
Private answer

Thanks for your question. I guess different dentists would have differing thoughts about the cause of your enamel wear, and the best way of repairing it. Certainly what your dentist has prescribed is one of the simplest and least destructive ways of dealing with the problem. Done well, composite fillings can last years without staining significantly (always assuming you are not a smoker); and if the cause of your enamel wear is indeed toothbrushing, then this would be a good way of repairing the damage. More durable restorations involve using ceramics for increased strength and aesthetics, but are obviously more expensive, and can involve removing healthy tooth structure as well as that which has already been lost. If the teeth in question are already heavily filled then crowns may make for a strong and cosmetic repair. Ultimately having the composite repairs will not preclude any other solutions at a later date. I hope this helps a bit!

Marked as spam
Posted by Dental Professional (Questions: 0, Answers: 1475)
Answered on 22/10/2007 12:00 am
0
Private answer

Thank you for your query concerning your dental care. You describe tooth brush abrasion, which  would be unusual on the top or biting surface of your teeth.


Assuming that the tooth brushing has caused enamel wear on the side (outer surface) of your teeth (and the lesion is of reasonable size) then a composite filling would be fine.  If the problem is on the biting surface then, depending on the size and shape of the lesion, either composite or porcelain could be used. I suggest you arrange for your dentist, to show you how to brush correctly, to avoid causing further damage which would limit the life of the restoration..


 

Marked as spam
Posted by Dental Professional (Questions: 0, Answers: 1475)
Answered on 22/10/2007 12:00 am
0
Private answer

Tooth brushing may contribute to enamel breakdown along the gum line of a tooth, but it is rarely the major underlying cause.  The normal underlying cause of this problem is the way your teeth bite together (your occlusion).  Essentially some teeth are working harder than others due to an uneven bite or excessive grinding of the teeth (most people do this at night time and don't even know they do it).


To resolve the problem composite fillings help.  However these will eventually fracture off, if the underlying problem of your bite is not addressed.  If you prefer a long term preventative approach so that you are not constantly replacing these types of fillings every couple of years, then equalisation of your bite is the way forward.

Marked as spam
Posted by Dental Professional (Questions: 0, Answers: 1475)
Answered on 17/10/2007 12:00 am
0
Private answer

This is without doubt the treatment of choice. It is completely non-invasive, thoroughly tried-and-tested and offers excellent aesthetics when done nicely.  How long they last will depend to some extent on what you do with them, but you can expect years and years from them.  If, in the course of time, any of them need replacement, you just have it rebuilt at no harm to the tooth  - easy, safe and inexpensive.

Marked as spam
Posted by Dental Professional (Questions: 0, Answers: 1475)
Answered on 17/10/2007 12:00 am
0
Private answer

First there can be an underlying cause to your tooth erosion.  It is a symptom of a tooth that is hitting the other teeth at the wrong time and too often.  This can lead to your roots being exposed and make the dentine, which is weaker, become exposed to the attrition of your toothbrush and paste, as the gum moves down the root (see occlusion category) and, unless resolved, your tooth will be under the same stresses as before the repair. 


Composites are a standard material used in dentistry.  Your concern as to safety would be down to the manufacturer's instructions and contents of the material used. Some composites will tend to stain quicker than others.  Another influencing factor will be how well it is applied and polished by the user dentist. This technique is generally cheaper and works quite well in the right hands. In time, if they discolour they can be re-polished and or replaced easily. This material is aesthetic and replaces the use of amalgam for small repairs in teeth.


Small repairs can be done using laboratory made porcelain; they will generally last much longer and do not stain. I would think that this technique would cost the same as a crown or veneer and would probably put you and your dentist off but it is available on request I am sure.

Marked as spam
Posted by Dental Professional (Questions: 0, Answers: 1475)
Answered on 17/10/2007 12:00 am